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Sri Lanka - bank and public holidays of the world - 1970-2070

full calendar of public and bank holidays of the world (and banks closures), from 1970 until 2070 for Sri Lanka



Internet domain: .lk - Telephone code: +94 - International dialing code: 00
Currency: Rupee (LKR) ... Convert here!
Weekend: Saturday & Sunday

IF YOU NEED TRANSLATION INTO THIS COUNTRY's LANGUAGE(S):
English (350 million speakers in 47 countries), Singhalese (16 million speakers), Tamil (55 million speakers) ...
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Name Date Kind More
End of Ramadan (may be changed to the nearest day)Monday July 6, 2015Muslim, Sufi 
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Esala Perahera**Sunday July 19, 2015Hinduism 
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summer holiday (end)Monday August 10, 2015School holidays 
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Raksha Bandhan / Nikini Poya (Janai Purnima)*Monday August 17, 2015Hinduism 
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End of Ramadan (may be changed to the nearest day) -
Wednesday July 6, 2016

Muslim, Sufi :


Esala Perahera -
Tuesday July 19, 2016

Hinduism : On the Esala full moon, the Kandy Esala Perahera takes place. The most important and spectacular festival in SL, it is the climax of 10 days and nights of increasing frenetic activity in Kandy. Thousands of dancers, drummers, and temple chieftains take part in the parade that also features 50 or more magnificently decorated elephants honouring the Sacred Tooth relic of the Golden Temple. Smaller peraheras are held at this time at other locations in the island.


Summer holiday (end) -
Wednesday August 10, 2016

School holidays (please double check) : http://www.osc.lk/calendar.htm


Raksha Bandhan / Nikini Poya (Janai Purnima) -
Wednesday August 17, 2016

Hinduism : The annual festival of Raksha Bandhan, which is meant to commemorate the abiding ties between siblings of opposite sex, usually takes place in late August, and is marked by a very simple ceremony in which a woman ties a rakhi — which may be a colorful thread, a simple bracelet, or a decorative string — around the wrist of her brother(s). The word raksha signifies protection, and bandhan is an association signifying an enduring sort of bond; and so, when a woman ties a rakhi around the waist of her brother, she signifies her loving attachment to him. He, likewise, recognizes the special bonds between them, and by extending his wrist forward, he in fact extends the hand of his protection over her.